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2018 Faculty Development Workshops

Rita Breidenbach, Assistant Provost for Faculty Development

2018 FACULTY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS

New workshops have been added on November 5th and November 7th. We encourage you to scroll through the complete list of workshops below.

All programs are open to full-time and part-time faculty, graduate students, and staff.

To register for a workshop, please contact facdevnet@newschool.edu. Please add the facdevnet calendar to your google calendar. The calendar is also available here. And please refer to the faculty development website at the same address for information on all areas of faculty support including teaching and learning, research and creative practice, review and reappointment and resources for part-time faculty. 

Research and Grants 2: How to ask for the money you want

Friday, September 28, 12:30-2:00 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801 & via Zoom

with Michael Schober, Vice Provost for Research and Professor of Psychology, and David Ngo, Associate Provost for Research Support

Hosted by the Provost’s Office of Research Support, these sessions do not require you to attend sequentially and you are encouraged to attend any/all as determined by your interests. Session 2 focuses on what it takes to develop a solid and fundable budget and how funders will assess the plausibility of your proposed budget. Topics discussed will include:

  • Thinking through what realistically you will need to accomplish your goals
  • How funders think about allowable costs, and what it takes to justify the need for those expenses
  • Realistic thinking about different kinds of potential expenditures, from researcher and student salaries to travel to equipment to indirect costs
  • Who you can work with at The New School to get support in developing a project budget

Research and Grants 3: Go into your grant with your eyes open: What you need to be prepared for should you receive the grant

Friday, October 5, 12:30-2:00 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801 & via Zoom

with Michael Schober, Vice Provost for Research and Professor of Psychology; David Ngo, Associate Provost for Research Support; Hegulka Scheiman, Program Manager for Research Integrity

Hosted by the Provost’s Office of Research Support, these sessions do not require you to attend sequentially and you are encouraged to attend any/all as determined by your interests. Session 3 focuses on what you, as a principal investigator with external funding, need to be prepared for once you receive a grant. Topics discussed will include:

  • How do you start to spend the money, and how is it different for different categories of expenses?
  • What are you responsible for keeping track of and monitoring, and what is done by staff members?
  • What additional agreements or contracts might be needed?
  • How do you keep up with the federal or funder regulations that apply to your award (e.g., documenting that students supported by the award have been trained in Responsible Conduct of Research, documenting IRB approval of research with human subjects, monitoring expenditures at the right level of detail)?
  • How will you demonstrate success to the funder through annual and final reports?

Managing the Dynamic: Creating a supportive and inclusive learning environment

Tuesday, October 9, 4:00-5:15 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801

with Rita Breidenbach, Assistant Provost for Faculty Development

We live in challenging times. Now more than ever, classroom and teacher-student dynamics can be easily disrupted, even permanently damaged, and sometimes you don’t even know why. Understand some of the ways in which things can go wrong. Learn how to set the stage for effective faculty-student and student-student communication and interaction. Learn methods to create a more supportive environment that promotes student learning. Explore teaching techniques that can transform the classroom experience. This session is a blend of presentation and group interaction and offers an introduction to a number of topics that should invite further exploration.

On the Horizon: The Future of Higher Education

Thursday, October 11, 3:00-4:15 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801

with Maya Georgieva, Director of Digital Learning

What is on the five-year horizon for higher education institutions? Which trends and technology developments will drive educational change? What are the critical challenges and how can we strategize solutions? Join Maya Georgieva, one of 71 global experts who collaborated on the 2018 Horizon Report for Higher Education, in an interactive discussion about the trends likely to impact teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. 

Collaboratory Workshop: Community Impact and Ethics of Public and Community-Based Scholarship
Monday, October 15, 12:00-1:30 pm, 55West 13th Street, Hirshon Suite Room 205

with Cynthia Lawson, Associate Professor of Integrated Design, Parsons and Director, DEED Research Lab; facilitated by Michele Kahane, Professor of Professional Practice and Associate Dean for Social Engagement, SPE, and Masoom Moitra, Part-Time Assistant Professor, Parsons & Community Urban Planner

The New School has historically been an intellectual and creative center for public and critical scholarship from around the world. To support faculty members involved in public scholarship and socially-engaged education, The New School Collaboratory and the Provost’s Office are co-sponsoring a series of workshops to promote discussions about community-engaged learning and practice. This workshop will focus on the challenges inherent in socially-engaged scholarship, teaching, and practice work at The New School. We will discuss questions like: How do we define impact and how can it be evaluated in a way that captures outcomes relevant to diverse stakeholders (community members, organizational partners, students, educators, and funders)? How can frameworks for accountability be developed to ensure equitable practices while engaging with communities and what could these look like? How can we sustain our partnerships by being able to better communicate the impact of our work? As members of The New School, what are our shared values, principles and ethics around community engagement?

Designing and Assessing Student Multimedia Projects 

Wednesday, October 17, 2:30-3:45 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801

with Maya Georgieva, Director of Digital Learning

Multimedia projects allow students to explore different types of media (text, images, audio, video, graphics, data, etc.). They offer an opportunity for students to actively engage in a project and gain new insights. Most important, they give students the chance to be creative, solve problems and think critically. How do you make multimedia assignments an effective and engaging learning experience for your students? And how do you evaluate student projects? In this workshop, we will review steps to guide you through the process of crafting meaningful multimedia assignments. Finally, we will discuss ways to evaluate the different components of the projects based on a number of criteria no matter what the medium.  

SafeZone Workshop

Friday, October 19, 10:00 am-2:00 pm, 55 West 13th Street, Room 1205

The New School is committed to creating an environment where all members of the community are treated with dignity and respect regardless of gender or sexual orientation. Faculty and staff are encouraged to attend this intensive education and training session on the importance of building safe and inclusive spaces for all members of the New School community. Emphasis is on understanding gender, gender identity, and sexuality. For more information and to register, contact safezone@newschool.edu

Admin Anon
Friday, October 19, 4:00-5:00 pm, Faculty & Staff Lounge, NW Corner, 7th Floor, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue
with Rita Breidenbach, Assistant Provost for Faculty Development
Are you a faculty member with administrative responsibilities, like director, chair or coordinator? Feeling overwhelmed? You’re not alone. Join me and your fellow faculty administrators for mutual support, problem-solving, brainstorming and skill building, like managing conflict, managing your inbox, and making time for you. There is no set agenda for this monthly gathering. Bring your issues.

Immersive Storytelling with 360 Video

Tuesday, October 23, 3:00-5:00 pm, 71 Fifth Avenue, Room 901

with Maya Georgieva, Director of Digital Learning

In this interactive hands-on workshop, we will review examples and explore key elements in the design of compelling 360° video experiences to gain a deeper understanding of immersive storytelling. We will learn and experiment with 360° video cameras and editing tools, and brainstorm project ideas. We will discuss and identify strategies and project-based use cases for the implementation of 360° video in the learning environment and on campus.

Embodied Learning: The Power of Play

Wednesday, October 24, 10:00 am-12:00 pm, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, Starr Foundation Hall, Lower Level Room 102
with Roger Manix, Creativity Consultant and Part-Time Assistant Professor, Parsons

This workshop revolves around exercises designed to promote social and emotional intelligence. There is an untapped well of resources available to augment and change our mindsets. Through experiential learning, participants confront and reflect on habits that may be inhibiting their connection to both themselves and others, all while beginning to let go of old ideas to allow fresh insights to filter through. A sense of vitality and presence is generated, paving the way for increased strategic thinking, a stronger commitment to being a successful communicator, and a deeper connection to the world around them. 

Anti-Oppression Workshop

Thursday, October 25, 11:00 am–3:00 pm, 55 West 13th Street, Hirshon Suite Room 205

The New School is an institution that (intentionally or not) replicates the power dynamics and injustice that we see in greater society. The aim of this basic anti-oppression workshop is to learn about power, privilege, and oppression, with a focus on microaggression as a manifestation of oppression we strive to recognize, address and eradicate. Topics covered include:

  • Brave Spaces and community agreements
  • Understanding types of oppression
  • Microaggression: definitions, how to respond, university resources
  • Intersectionality and how our multiple identities interact with power and privilege
  • Ways for non-marginalized people to further their development as allies

To participate or obtain more information, email wellness@newschool.edu.

#sowhite #ally: Teaching with sensitivity in a diverse classroom

Wednesday, October 31, 4:00-5:30 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 510

with Bryan Melillo, Part-Time Assistant Professor, Parsons First Year

I am white and male teaching a student body which is—in large part—not. How can faculty, especially white faculty, lead classes in ways that protect our students from biases, prejudices and other potential unconscious words and actions of our own or their fellow students that can cause harm? This workshop opens a dialogue about all of the above, including the concepts of being an ally and of creating brave spaces for learning. I’ll share a bit of my personal story, a sort of “how I got here, from there,” and welcome others to do so as well. I’ll also share some inclusive teaching practices that support and honor the diversity of my classroom and invite participants to share their successes and, more importantly, their challenges. It’s all a work in progress and I hope you’ll join me in this conversation, regardless of your racial, gender, ability, or other identities. 

Managing the Dynamic: Creating a supportive and inclusive learning environment

Thursday, November 1, 4:00-5:15 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801

with Rita Breidenbach, Assistant Provost for Faculty Development

We live in challenging times. Now more than ever, classroom and teacher-student dynamics can be easily disrupted, even permanently damaged, and sometimes you don’t even know why. Understand some of the ways in which things can go wrong. Learn how to set the stage for effective faculty-student and student-student communication and interaction. Learn methods to create a more supportive environment that promotes student learning. Explore teaching techniques that can transform the classroom experience. This session is a blend of presentation and group interaction and offers an introduction to a number of topics that should invite further exploration.

How to Manage Conflict in the Workplace

Monday, November 5, 12:00-1:00 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801

with Ann-Louise Shapiro, Faculty and Staff Ombuds

Conflict is an inevitable aspect of life. All of us manage conflict routinely but not all outcomes are as productive as we might want. In fact, workplace conflict need not be toxic or debilitating. And problems that are papered over or ignored rarely go away. What each of us needs is an expanded repertoire for managing conflict. How can we move beyond ‘winning,’ ‘losing,’ or settling for compromises that neither party likes? The goal of this workshop, therefore, is not to eliminate conflict but to work on skills for ensuring more satisfying outcomes. In this workshop we will:

  • Identify and explore different conflict styles
  • Learn new skills for moving beyond oppositional positions
  • Practice ways to de-escalate conflict situations

Faculty of Color Social

Wednesday, November 7, 4:00-7:00 pm, Faculty & Staff Lounge, 7th Floor, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue

with Rita Breidenbach, Assistant Provost for Faculty Development

Join us for an evening of conversation and brainstorming about ways the university can and should support faculty of color. Wine and cheese will be served.

Approaches to Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Thursday, November 8, 10:00-11:30 am, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801 & via Zoom

with Cotter Christian, Assistant Professor of Interior Design; Timo Rissanen, Assistant Professor of Fashion Design and Sustainability; Anezka Sebek, Associate Professor of Media Design

This talk presents ongoing work from a faculty group focused on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), a relatively new type of scholarship that uses teaching and student learning as the object of research, an approach of particular interest to faculty with a strong commitment to teaching and looking to establish a sustainable research agenda. The group formed during a faculty development workshop two years ago with a view to fostering a culture of scholarship of teaching and learning across the university during coming years. A Mutual Mentoring grant from the Provost’s Office allowed the group to bring in external mentors last year, and team members will share how this has shaped their scholarship and teaching practice, and how the group is moving forward. We invite faculty who are curious about or have an interest in the practice of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning to learn ways in which they can begin this type of research. Please join us in our efforts to deeply understand student learning and academic research and how both contribute to The New School learning community and beyond.

Collaboratory Workshop: Telling the Story of your Work: Scholar Activism & the Power of Documentation and Evaluation

Friday, November 9, 12:00-1:30 pm, 55 West 13th Street, Hirshon Suite Room 205

with Michele Kahane, Professor of Professional Practice and Associate Dean for Social Engagement, Schools of Public Engagement; Masoom Moitra, Part-Time Assistant Professor, Parsons, and other faculty presenters to be announced

The New School has historically been an intellectual and creative center for public and critical scholarship from around the world. To support faculty members involved in public scholarship and socially-engaged education, The New School Collaboratory and the Provost’s Office are co-sponsoring a series of workshops that will involve discussions around the complex challenges and opportunities involved in community-engaged learning and practice. This workshop will be shaped around pertinent institutional challenges faced by faculty at The New School who are engaged with public scholarship and practice. How can we better tell the story of our work and construct narratives that encourage institutional support, funding, and fair evaluation of our scholarship? How can we evidence these stories and highlight the unique outcomes and challenges of community-engaged academic work? How can we apply the same creativity and rigor that we teach our students into enhancing the documentation of our work? What kind of evaluation systems are best suited to support, recognize and capture the scales, nuances, failure, and successes of public scholarship?

Campuses Under Pressure:  College Students and the Growing Emotional Health Crisis 

Tuesday, November 13, 12:00-1:30 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801 & via Zoom

with Steven Faerm, Associate Professor of Fashion, and Vanessa McGann, Assistant Director, Student Health Services

Across the U.S., record numbers of college students are experiencing emotional challenges. Rising levels of anxiety are particularly alarming: since 2009, there has been an increase of 122% in undergraduates diagnosed with or treated for, anxiety. What’s behind the sudden, dramatic increase? What does research reveal about the possible causes and effects? How can an awareness of students’ growing challenges help us create better learning environments? This presentation examines the current research of emotional well-being in our nation and on our college campuses. Focus will be given to college student development and the impact of stress on learning. Participants will also learn teaching methods that aim to alleviate students’ concerns and create optimal learning environments, resources available to students on campus, and early warning signs of students at risk.

Understanding Sexual Harassment

Thursday, November 15, 1:00-2:00 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801

with Rhonnie Jaus, Vice President for Equal Employment Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Compliance

Learn more about workplace sexual harassment and the duties and protections of Title IX and other relevant state and local laws. Learn how to recognize and prevent harassment and how to create a safe and respectful environment.

GreenZone Training: Supporting New School Military Veterans and other students with military backgrounds

Thursday, November 15, 3:00-4:00 pm, 66 West 12th Street, Room 801 & via Zoom
with Brian ‘Marty’ Martineau, Coordinator of Student Veteran Services

GreenZone Training is designed for faculty and staff who wish to learn more about the experience of New School students who are veterans and have military backgrounds, a population that is larger than many may realize. The goal of the training is to educate and train members of The New School community to understand and learn the issues and concerns faced by military veteran and military-affiliated students and to have additional individuals within their network. The training is not designed for faculty and staff to become “experts”, but to help identify students’ needs and connect them with the resources available to them. By completing the training, participants will receive a sign to display in their workspace allowing military-affiliated students to identify a “green zone” of support. 

Techniques for Supporting International Students

Friday, November 16, 10:30 am-12:00 pm, 55 West 13th Street, Hirshon Suite Room 205
with Theresa Breland, Part-Time Assistant Professor of ESL

This workshop will explore challenges faced by international students, including linguistic demands of college reading and writing, as well as barriers to active participation. Best practices for supporting international students’ coursework and in-class participation will be shared. Participants will walk away with practical strategies they can use in their classes right away.


Admin Anon
Friday, November 16, 4:00-5:00 pm, Faculty & Staff Lounge, NW Corner, 7th Floor, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue
with Rita Breidenbach, Assistant Provost for Faculty Development
Are you a faculty member with administrative responsibilities, like director, chair or coordinator? Feeling overwhelmed? You’re not alone. Join me and your fellow faculty administrators for mutual support, problem-solving, brainstorming and skill building, like managing conflict, managing your inbox, and making time for you. There is no set agenda for this monthly gathering. Bring your issues.

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